Five NTU PhD students recognised for outstanding environmental and sustainability research

Jul 11 2012

Five NTU PhD students recognised for outstanding environmental and sustainability research

World Future Foundation (WFF) awards cash prizes to credit research efforts towards creating innovative solutions to environmental issues

The ‘WFF PhD Award in Environmental and Sustainability Research’ is Singapore's first-of-its-kind award to recognise excellence in doctoral-level (PhD) environmental and sustainability research. Each of the ten students, five from NTU and five from the National University of Singapore (NUS), received a cash prize of US$10,000 each, making the cash award the highest amongst student prizes given out at Singapore universities.

A Singapore-registered charity organisation devoted to advancing research and development of new environmental technologies, WFF introduced the PhD Awards in environmental and sustainability research in 2010.

This year’s PhD prize winners studied a wide range of topics, such as environmentally friendly water treatment systems, high performance biofuel separation and purification, novel solar cells and rechargeable energy storage systems.

Dr Aung Ko Ko Kyaw of NTU’s School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, found an innovative way to design and fabricate a new type of organic solar cell set to improve current technology. These excitonic solar cells, particularly organic solar cells and dye-sensitised solar cells, cost less than conventional silicon solar cells. Excitonic solar cells attract a lot of attention in solar cell research because they can be produced from low-temperature and solution-processed roll-to-roll manufacturing technology. This helps to reduce the cost of production and energy pay-back time tremendously.

Due to his impactful research on excitonic solar cells, Dr Aung was awarded the A*STAR International Fellowship to pursue post-doctoral research at the University of California, Santa Barbara, USA, under the supervision of Nobel laureate Professor Alan Heeger.

Fellow NTU researcher, Dr Grace Wee from the School of Materials Science and Engineering, developed a new form of printable and flexible super-capacitors using nanotube-based electrodes. This new technology will make it possible to provide power solutions to printed electronic devices such as smart cards, Radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags and e-papers, at low cost. Furthermore, it may also be integrated with energy harnessing devices, such as solar cells, to provide a reliable source of electricity supply for stand-alone power systems and commercial applications.

Printing super-capacitors on flexible materials such as plastic will also allow electronics to be placed on curved surfaces. Dr Wee, who is passionate about applying research knowledge to improve people’s daily lives, collaborated with a US start-up company that was also interested in developing super-capacitors.

Dr Feng Lun, the Chairman of WFF said: “This marks World Future Foundation’s third year in giving out this prestigious annual award. I am delighted to see another group of NUS and NTU high calibre scholars emerge, excelling in their own fields of research. With their knowledge and passion, they have displayed dynamic capabilities to explore sustainable development for the environment constantly. I would like to extend my sincere congratulations to all the winners, and hope more promising students would join us in fulfilling the mission of contributing to the well-being of humankind.”

NTU’s Associate Provost in charge of Graduate Education, Professor Peter Preiser, said that the University received more than 30 top quality nominations from Schools in NTU, shortlisted from over 400 candidates. “The selection of winners has become increasingly challenging, as our graduates have performed extremely well in their research. So it is indeed a feather in the cap for the winning PhD graduates to receive this prestigious award, and it also speaks to the quality of NTU's sustainability research and excellence of its graduate training. I am sure that all of these young researchers will have a very bright future ahead of them,” he added.

List of winners

Nanyang Technological University:

  • Dr Aung Ko Ko Kyaw, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering – ‘Design and fabrication of excitonic solar cells’.
  • Dr Li Aidan, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering – ‘Experimental and theoretical study of cathode catalyst layer in PEM fuel cells’.
  • Dr Liu Jiehua, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences – ‘Two-dimension nano-architecture for novel catalysts and electrode materials’.
  • Dr Wee Tsyh Ying Grace, School of Materials Science and Engineering – ‘Charge storage and transport mechanism in printable supercapacitors’.
  • Dr Zhang Wei, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering – ‘Photocatalytic systems for visible light driven H2 production from water’.

To read a summary of NTU winners’ research projects, please click here.

National University of Singapore:

  • Dr Chen Jie, Faculty of Science – ‘Theoretical investigation on thermal properties of silicon based nanostructures’.
  • Dr Panu Sukitpaneenit, Faculty of Engineering – ‘Fundamentals of PVDF hollow fiber membrane formation and pervaporation for ethanol-water separation’.
  • Dr Saravanan Kuppan, Faculty of Science – ‘Synthesis of nano-structured materials and their application in lithium ion batteries’.
  • Dr Wei Yuting, Faculty of Engineering – ‘Removal of anionic contaminants by environmental-friendly engineered materials’.
  • Dr Zhang Wei, Faculty of Engineering – ‘Fabrication of dye sensitised solar cells with enhanced conversion efficiency’.

© Alumni Affairs Office

 

For the original article, please refer to:

http://enewsletter.ntu.edu.sg/classact/Jul12/Pages/cn4.aspx

World Future Foundation (WFF) awards cash prizes to credit research efforts towards creating innovative solutions to environmental issues

The ‘WFF PhD Award in Environmental and Sustainability Research’ is Singapore's first-of-its-kind award to recognise excellence in doctoral-level (PhD) environmental and sustainability research. Each of the ten students, five from NTU and five from the National University of Singapore (NUS), received a cash prize of US$10,000 each, making the cash award the highest amongst student prizes given out at Singapore universities.

A Singapore-registered charity organisation devoted to advancing research and development of new environmental technologies, WFF introduced the PhD Awards in environmental and sustainability research in 2010.

This year’s PhD prize winners studied a wide range of topics, such as environmentally friendly water treatment systems, high performance biofuel separation and purification, novel solar cells and rechargeable energy storage systems.

Dr Aung Ko Ko Kyaw of NTU’s School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, found an innovative way to design and fabricate a new type of organic solar cell set to improve current technology. These excitonic solar cells, particularly organic solar cells and dye-sensitised solar cells, cost less than conventional silicon solar cells. Excitonic solar cells attract a lot of attention in solar cell research because they can be produced from low-temperature and solution-processed roll-to-roll manufacturing technology. This helps to reduce the cost of production and energy pay-back time tremendously.

Due to his impactful research on excitonic solar cells, Dr Aung was awarded the A*STAR International Fellowship to pursue post-doctoral research at the University of California, Santa Barbara, USA, under the supervision of Nobel laureate Professor Alan Heeger.

Fellow NTU researcher, Dr Grace Wee from the School of Materials Science and Engineering, developed a new form of printable and flexible super-capacitors using nanotube-based electrodes. This new technology will make it possible to provide power solutions to printed electronic devices such as smart cards, Radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags and e-papers, at low cost. Furthermore, it may also be integrated with energy harnessing devices, such as solar cells, to provide a reliable source of electricity supply for stand-alone power systems and commercial applications.

Printing super-capacitors on flexible materials such as plastic will also allow electronics to be placed on curved surfaces. Dr Wee, who is passionate about applying research knowledge to improve people’s daily lives, collaborated with a US start-up company that was also interested in developing super-capacitors.

Dr Feng Lun, the Chairman of WFF said: “This marks World Future Foundation’s third year in giving out this prestigious annual award. I am delighted to see another group of NUS and NTU high calibre scholars emerge, excelling in their own fields of research. With their knowledge and passion, they have displayed dynamic capabilities to explore sustainable development for the environment constantly. I would like to extend my sincere congratulations to all the winners, and hope more promising students would join us in fulfilling the mission of contributing to the well-being of humankind.”

NTU’s Associate Provost in charge of Graduate Education, Professor Peter Preiser, said that the University received more than 30 top quality nominations from Schools in NTU, shortlisted from over 400 candidates. “The selection of winners has become increasingly challenging, as our graduates have performed extremely well in their research. So it is indeed a feather in the cap for the winning PhD graduates to receive this prestigious award, and it also speaks to the quality of NTU's sustainability research and excellence of its graduate training. I am sure that all of these young researchers will have a very bright future ahead of them,” he added.

List of winners

Nanyang Technological University:

  • Dr Aung Ko Ko Kyaw, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering – ‘Design and fabrication of excitonic solar cells’.
  • Dr Li Aidan, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering – ‘Experimental and theoretical study of cathode catalyst layer in PEM fuel cells’.
  • Dr Liu Jiehua, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences – ‘Two-dimension nano-architecture for novel catalysts and electrode materials’.
  • Dr Wee Tsyh Ying Grace, School of Materials Science and Engineering – ‘Charge storage and transport mechanism in printable supercapacitors’.
  • Dr Zhang Wei, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering – ‘Photocatalytic systems for visible light driven H2 production from water’.

To read a summary of NTU winners’ research projects, please click here.

National University of Singapore:

  • Dr Chen Jie, Faculty of Science – ‘Theoretical investigation on thermal properties of silicon based nanostructures’.
  • Dr Panu Sukitpaneenit, Faculty of Engineering – ‘Fundamentals of PVDF hollow fiber membrane formation and pervaporation for ethanol-water separation’.
  • Dr Saravanan Kuppan, Faculty of Science – ‘Synthesis of nano-structured materials and their application in lithium ion batteries’.
  • Dr Wei Yuting, Faculty of Engineering – ‘Removal of anionic contaminants by environmental-friendly engineered materials’.
  • Dr Zhang Wei, Faculty of Engineering – ‘Fabrication of dye sensitised solar cells with enhanced conversion efficiency’.

© Alumni Affairs Office

 

For the original article, please refer to:

http://enewsletter.ntu.edu.sg/classact/Jul12/Pages/cn4.aspx